Rugby Club Raises Funds With BBQ

Summer is the perfect time for gathering outdoors, enjoying family and friends, and eating a hearty meal cooked on a grill. Llangennech RFC Juniors took full advantage of the season on 22nd June when they held a club fundraiser by hosting a hog roast and entertainment night.

They were able to raise £450 to buy equipment for their juniors teams, which account for over 100 of the club’s nearly 400-person membership base.

The village of Llangennech has a strong rugby history that dates back to 1885. Llangennech RFC came about after Llanelli RFC, founded in 1875, won their first major trophy with the 1884 South Wales Challenge Cup, forerunner to the modern Welsh Cup. The victory had a strong impact on the community, and local villages became more enthusiastic about the sport than ever before.

The Welsh Rugby Union (WRU) has governed game play in Wales since 1881, when 11 clubs came together to form the union. It now runs 293 clubs, and the union also handles the Welsh national team and all national leagues and cups. Millennium Stadium, the 74,500 capacity facility in Cardiff, is also owned by the WRU.

This event marked the club’s second annual hog roast, and organiser Nigel Wyn Edwards says that help from the community has made it possible to make a good profit each time.

“The hog was donated by Jason Oakley, a player’s father who is a farmer, and the spit was loaned, free of charge, by another village group. Friends of the club did the carving, while the coaches chipped in to serve and tidy up.

“A few of the other fathers spent 12 hours cooking the hog over a wood burning spit at the rugby club, starting at six in the morning. Last year, the entertainment was also free as another player’s parent is in a band.”

Entertainment for this year’s fundraiser featured a female vocalist and an all-ages disco to appeal to the many families in attendance. They also had a bottle raffle during the event and offered tickets to their local regional rugby team, the Scarlets, as prizes.

Edwards feels word of mouth worked best to inform the community, but they also used posts on club and village Facebook pages, posters around the village and local radio to publicise their roast.

So, how best to plan for a food-centric family event?

“Don’t go over the top on the food,” Edwards recommends. “As it’s the second one we have held, we had a good idea on what was required and learned from last year, but we still had some food left over both years! Also, get entertainment that will appeal to all ages,” to try to make sure children stay occupied.